Sterling Office
46440 Benedict Dr
Suite 111
Sterling, VA 20164

Shin Splints

Our team of podiatric specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your feet. Please use our podiatric library to learn more about podiatric problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, please feel free to contact us.

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Step Away from Foot Pain (2 pages)

Bunion Deformities and Treatment (4 pages)

Plantar Fascitis - Heel Pain (2 pages)

Heel Spurs (2 pages)

Plantar Fascitis: Treatment Program (2 pages)

Shin Splints (2 pages)

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (2 pages)

Achilles Tendon Injuries (3 pages)

Morton's Neuroma (3 pages)

Ingrown Toenailes (2 pages)

Stiff Arthritic Big Toe (2 pages)

Ankle Sprain (3 pages)

Calcaneal Apophysitis - Children's Heel Pain (2 pages)

Haglunds Deformity - Pump Bump (1 page)

Subluxed Cuboid Syndrome (1 page)

Tailor's Bunionette (1 page)

Seismoiditis (2 pages)

Hyperpronation and Foot Pain (10 pages)


Links to sites that provide free patient education articles:

Shin splints” is a term to describe pain and swelling in the front of the lower legs. The pain usually appears after and is aggravated by repetitive activities such as running or walking. Contributing causes are flat feet, calf tightness, improper training techniques, worn out or improper shoes/sneakers, as well as running or walking on uneven surfaces. The inflammation in the shin results from the repeated pull of a muscle in the leg from the shin bone (tibia).

This condition usually occurs bilaterally (both legs) and can be alleviated by rest, use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, icing, a change in training habits, stretching exercises, and properly fitted shoes. A foot and ankle surgeon can treat the condition, recommend proper shoe gear, and evaluate whether orthotics are needed. If not treated, shin splints may eventually result in a stress fracture of the shin bone.